A Special Trick Helped Linford Christie Win Gold at Barcelona 1992 | On The Line

A Special Trick Helped Linford Christie Win Gold at Barcelona 1992 | On The Line


(ON THE LINE) (OLDEST MAN, BARCELONA 1992) (BARCELONA,
1ST AUGUST 1992, 8PM) I’m the oldest man
have won the Olympics. Everyone started to believe,
you know, “If Linford can do it at 32,
why can’t I?” (JOSE LUIS LOPEZ, SPAIN) (PHYSICAL TRAINER AND
RADIO COMMENTATOR) Yes? The Barcelona Olympic Games meant the entry of a new stage in the planet’s top
sporting competition. They are first truly
modern Games. Carl Lewis did not participate
in the 100 metres, only in the long jump
and 4×100 metres because he was sick and couldn’t give his best in the USA classifying trials. Yes, I was in Barcelona ’92,
with Cadena SER. They were my second
Olympic Games and they were in my city. I remember the live commentary
of the final of the 100 metres, I remember we said
it was a very open race, that were really liked Leroy
Burrell in the semifinals, but that Linford Christie was
giving off very good feelings. (LINFORD CHRISTIE,
GREAT BRITAIN) (100 METRES – 200 METRES –
4×100 METRES RELAY) Hello, I’m Linford Christie. Leroy Burrell was most probably
the favourite because… he was the fastest
in the field. I was 32 and, for a lot
of people, you know, when I watch some of
the commentaries back and everything else, and
people say, “Oh, you know, “I was going to be too old.” Age is nothing but a number
and it’s in your mind. And I honestly do,
you know, feel that. I wouldn’t even say
it was my peak because I ran faster
the year after that. It’s just I didn’t let them
get into my head like that. (BEST BIRTHDAY WISHES) (HAPPY BIRTHDAY) And I do feel that it
gave me that big advantage because of, you know,
the age and experience and everything else. We were out there and some of the journalists
came and took me and said, “Oh, Linford, how does it
feel to be the favourite?” As soon as I saw Leroy Burrell
coming up I said, “No, I’m not the favourite,
Leroy’s the favourite.” And then everybody went over
to talk to Leroy and I just… and I ran away. So what I did there
was to shift. You know, cos the favourite
horse is always under pressure and I didn’t want that kind of
pressure so, you know, part of my
psychological warfare, I shifted the pressure
over to Leroy. You have to try and think how are you going to
beat your opponent? So you have to use your mind to get into their minds. That’s the way the race is won. So by the time we got,
you know, out to the final, he had a false start and I knew then that was
going to unsettle him. Cos again, you know,
I do feel that I was one of the most
experienced athletes out there. We got out the blocks, and because Leroy then
had to hold back, you know, I knew then
that, you know, by the time I got to 60 metres I knew the race was won,
cos I knew then I was virtually in front, apart from, I think,
maybe Frankie Fredericks was on the outside. He was running pretty well,
he started pretty well but I knew I had the strength, you know, that
I was going to win. And I won! At his 32 years of age
he got a gold medal that signified
the triumph of constancy, of perseverance. It was the culmination
of an entire sporting life in which he’d fought hard
to get to be number one. (FRANKIE FREDERICKS, NAMIBIA,
100 METRES – 200 METRES) Hello. I knew that nobody
expected me to win a medal. I was in lane three and Leroy was in six,
Linford was in five. So I didn’t really…
I didn’t really… I just concentrated
on the guys around me. I said that all I have to do,
I said, “I have to beat “Raymond Stewart
that was in lane two, “and Dennis Mitchell that was
in four,” and I was in three. So I think I focused on only
that if I beat Dennis Mitchell then I know that…
I mean, at least the worst I can do is third. So that’s what I’ve focused on
and I tried to beat him and once I beat him I looked over. I did not see Leroy and then
I said, “OK, now I’m second.” If you look at the race and you
turn back and look at yourself, there’s eight black people,
eight black athletes, all in the race in the final. You have to do something that’s
going to make you stand out. Even if you don’t win, you’ve got to leave a mark
that someone will remember. This is the reason why, you
know, I started with all these outfits,
because I felt like, “Yes, I’ve got to stand out.” I was the first. Do something today that people
will talk about tomorrow and, you know, people are still
talking about my Lycras. I wasn’t the fastest, I just made everybody else
believe I was. That was my mind-set,
my mind game. (LINFORD CHRISTIE BECAME (THE THIRD BRITISH ATHLETE IN
HISTORY TO WIN THE OLYMPIC 100M (AFTER HAROLD ABRAHAMS
AND ALLAN WELLS) (HE DIDN’T START FOCUSING
ON ATHLETICS (UNTIL HE WAS 19 YEARS OLD) (FRANKIE FREDERICKS BECAME
THE FIRST OLYMPIC MEDALLIST (FROM NAMIBIA) (ON THE LINE) I’m having breakfast!

16 Comments

  1. Don't the big mouthed Yanks hate being beaten square and fair and then produce all the excuses in the world to why they lose. Just like the wars they enter, they've lost them all since WWII……And that is a fact………

  2. No doubt that the false start hit Burrell hard, otherwise he would have won. BUT, they both would have been fighting for silver had Carl Lewis been in the US 100m line-up. He had been injured before the US Olympic trials and finished 4th and only made it as a member of the relay team where he set an anchor record which stood for 16 years till Asafa Powell broke it. By the time of the Olympics Lewis was back to his best as he had been the previous year when he had set a world record.

  3. DNA tests show that where distant cousins😂 Lol How is that even possible 😂😂 on my dad's side tho😂

  4. It's so funny back then they thought 32 was old. Look at guys today like Justin Gatlin still top world class at 38. And many more world class athletes in mid 30's.

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