14 Comments

  1. if you apply the solder to the bottom rather than the top,and wait for it to come around to the top,you get a neater job 🙂
    (capillary action)

  2. Also, remember if you do NOT completely drain the copper line of ALL water, you will never be able to solder any joints. The copper lines must be water-free !!!

  3. Trick I was taught…
    If you are unable to properly drain all water from the pipe and it continues to drip, just jamb a bunch of bread (minus the crust) up inside the pipe. This will create a dam to keep the water back and give you enough time to heat up the joints to be soldered. Don't worry about the bread, cause when you turn ON the water, the bread comes out the faucet as mush.

  4. Remember, your pipes have to be completely empty in order to heat up your joints for soldering. If there is any water (in the pipe) in the area you want to solder, you will be there all day with the tourch and you will destroy the copper you are trying to seal. TOO MUCH heat is not good. Just like in the video, the solder will get sucked up and form a good seal.

    See the Trick…below, if you cannot empty the pipe of all water. It works for me.

  5. Good video but you can have problems IF
    1 you use iron oxide sand paper.
    2 you use flux that is not compatible with the solder which should be non lead type.
    3 you don't heat evenly around the pipe.
    Best to buy a kit with all the right elements.

  6. I wish we could have seen how you soldered the bottom of the T-shape pipe, that was running vertically. Would it run away from down, away from the fitting?

  7. water lines? why are you using M (red for heat) pipe you should be using L (blue for water) red is thinner walled than . your solder runs on your pipe made me cringe other than that good video for the DIYer and like michael said heat evenly i start with heating one side then when the solder starts to take i roll the heat to the other side then put solder on. remember rule to thumb 1/2 copper will take about 1/2 of solder 3/4 coper 3/4 solder. but nice to see initiative for that i aplaud

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