Shutoff Valve Repair for Bathrooms (Quick Tips) — by Home Repair Tutor

Shutoff Valve Repair for Bathrooms (Quick Tips) — by Home Repair Tutor


So here’s a question: Can you replace a
shutoff valve yourself? The answer is yes, all right? So I want you to know that you can totally
do this project yourself. Now in some cases, you may have to call in
a plumber. But most of the time, you will not have to
do that. I’m going to share with you some really
awesome tips that’ll help you prevent making that phone call that’ll cost you anywhere
from $100 to $200. So let’s dive into the tips right now. This is a standard shutoff valve. It’s an older one and just turns like this. Now this is also a compression sleeve shutoff
valve, meaning there’s a ferrule. The ferrule slides into the shutoff valve. There’s a nut that goes over top of it. And it secures to a piece of copper pipe that
way. So this is an old-school shutoff valve. How it works is you turn the handle, and it
spins inside this housing here until it stops. So it stops right here. So let’s take this apart and show you how
it works. You have to loosen the nut right here. If you take this apart, there’s a little
rubber washer right here. When your shutoff valve stops working and
water continues to flow to your toilet or to your faucet, it’s because this little
rubber washer’s gone bad. It forms a water-tight seal with the inside
of the shutoff valve. If you’re getting a leak at the shutoff
valve handle, like right here, there’s another rubber washer right here, and that rubber
washer’s gone bad. So again, how this works is it screws into
place. You turn it clockwise like so until, again,
that little rubber washer seats up against the housing here. It’s amazing how much damage can happen
because of a $4 or $5 shutoff valve. So now we’re going to walk you through how
to remove this from a piece of copper pipe. And by the way, there’s one tool that can
make this so much easier if you’re having trouble removing the ferrule. It’s called the Pasco, spelled P-A-S-C-O
Compression Sleeve Puller. Now I got this tip from one of the plumbers
that I do use at one of my rental properties, and it’s awesome. It’s not cheap. It’s about twenty-some dollars. But let’s say you have to replace like five
shutoff valves or redoing all your shutoff valves in your house, this puppy will definitely
come in handy. Let me share with you why. So how do you get this shutoff valve off the
copper pipe? It has a compression fitting on it, right? So what you do is you put a pair of channel
locks over the nut. Use another pair of channel locks. Now mind you, this is not in a wall or anything. The pipe is going to be sticking out of the
wall or out of the floor. You’re going to hold this nut with one pair
of channel locks, and you’re going to spin the shutoff valve with the other pair of channel
locks until it becomes loose, and just remove it like so—counterclockwise. Now typically when you slide this nut back,
you’re going to have a compression sleeve sitting right here. It’s not going to be very loose like this. If it is, you have a problem. But you might be able to pull it off like
so with your channel locks. Typically, that’s not the case. So what do you do? Using the compression sleeve puller, there’s
a slot right here. You want to slide that behind the ferrule. The next step is to slide the compression
sleeve puller into the pipe. So here’s a question: Can you replace a
shutoff valve yourself? The answer is yes, all right? So I want you to know that you
can totally do this project yourself. Now in some cases, you may have to call in a plumber.
But most of the time, you will not have to do that. I’m going to share with you some
really awesome tips that’ll help you prevent making that phone call that’ll cost you
anywhere from $100 to $200. So let’s dive into the tips right now.
This is a standard shutoff valve. It’s an older one and just turns like this. Now this
is also a compression sleeve shutoff valve, meaning there’s a ferrule. The ferrule slides
into the shutoff valve. There’s a nut that goes over top of it. And it secures to a piece
of copper pipe that way. So this is an old-school shutoff valve. How
it works is you turn the handle, and it spins inside this housing here until it stops. So
it stops right here. So let’s take this apart and show you how it works. You have
to loosen the nut right here. If you take this apart, there’s a little
rubber washer right here. When your shutoff valve stops working and water continues to
flow to your toilet or to your faucet, it’s because this little rubber washer’s gone
bad. It forms a water-tight seal with the inside of the shutoff valve. If you’re getting
a leak at the shutoff valve handle, like right here, there’s another rubber washer right
here, and that rubber washer’s gone bad. So again, how this works is it screws into
place. You turn it clockwise like so until, again, that little rubber washer seats up
against the housing here. It’s amazing how much damage can happen
because of a $4 or $5 shutoff valve. So now we’re going to walk you through how to remove
this from a piece of copper pipe. And by the way, there’s one tool that can make this
so much easier if you’re having trouble removing the ferrule. It’s called the Pasco,
spelled P-A-S-C-O Compression Sleeve Puller. Now I got this tip from one of the plumbers
that I do use at one of my rental properties, and it’s awesome. It’s not cheap. It’s
about twenty-some dollars. But let’s say you have to replace like five shutoff valves
or redoing all your shutoff valves in your house, this puppy will definitely come in
handy. Let me share with you why. So how do you get this shutoff valve off the
copper pipe? It has a compression fitting on it, right? So what you do is you put a
pair of channel locks over the nut. Use another pair of channel locks. Now mind you, this
is not in a wall or anything. The pipe is going to be sticking out of the wall or out
of the floor. You’re going to hold this nut with one pair of channel locks, and you’re
going to spin the shutoff valve with the other pair of channel locks until it becomes loose,
and just remove it like so—counterclockwise. Now typically when you slide this nut back,
you’re going to have a compression sleeve sitting right here. It’s not going to be
very loose like this. If it is, you have a problem. But you might be able to pull it
off like so with your channel locks. Typically, that’s not the case. So what do you do?
Using the compression sleeve puller, there’s a slot right here. You want to slide that
behind the ferrule. The next step is to slide the compression sleeve puller into the pipe.
So this compression sleeve puller is for a ½” copper pipe. So what you’ll do is
you’re going to slide the pipe out of the compression sleeve. So as you can see here,
as I move the compression sleeve puller, it’s pushing the pipe through until the compression
sleeve is there, and your pipe is removed. Uh, your pipe is not going to move; it’s
just moving the compression sleeve off of the copper pipe.
So anyhow, this is a really, really great tool. Again, it’s the Pasco Compression
Sleeve Puller. There’s a P on it for Pasco. So that’s one way to get a shutoff valve
off your pipe. Now you might run into shutoff valves that are either just threaded on. So
again, you just turn them until they come off. So you would turn them counterclockwise.
The worst possible situation—it’s not terrible—is the shutoff valve will be soldered
onto your pipe. In that case you can either heat it up and pull it off. If you’re afraid
of doing that you can just cut off the shutoff valve using one of these. This is an AutoCut
tool. It’s great. Love it. I use it all the time. You just clamp it onto the pipe.
Here, I’ll show you. Clamp it onto the pipe—there’s an arrow
on it—and you turn it in the direction of the arrow. This usually takes about seven
to ten revolutions; that’s it. And it automatically cuts the piece of copper. And it will cut
off your old shutoff valve as well. So this is a little great tool. It’s about $20.
So what are your options for brand new shutoff valves? Well, you probably have three different
options depending on your setup. If you do have a shutoff valve that threads on, you
want to go with the threaded shutoff valve. But here’s the deal. When you do that, you
want to opt for a quarter-turn ball valve. It looks like this. Basically, it just turns
one quarter turn—on and off—and that’s it. Whenever you have a plumbing emergency,
you don’t want to be fussing with your shutoff valve. So quarter-turn shutoff valves are
the best. So if you have to get a threaded one, get one that is a quarter-turn shutoff
valve. And then wrap it with six to seven revolutions with Teflon tape. So that’s
if you’ve got a threaded shutoff valve. You can also get quarter-turn shutoff valves
that have compression fittings. And you can get quarter-turn shutoff valves that are SharkBite
fittings, so just push-on fittings. Now I’ll show you how to use those right now.
So first of all, if you’re using copper pipes, you need to prep it adequately. So
in order to do that, you need to deburr the inside it, especially if you cut it off. Now
admittedly, you can use a utility knife, or you can use a deburring tool that’s on the
end of a Ridgid No. 15 pipe cutter. So anyhow, you just want to do this until you remove
the burr that’s on the inside of the copper pipe, then you can clean it out with a wire
brush like this. Then you want to slide it on to the inside of the wire brush and clean
off the outside first inch. The other thing that you can do is use emery cloth. Tear off
a piece like this till you clean the end of the copper pipe.
If you’re using a compression fitting, you want to slide the nut on first so that the
thread’s on the inside or facing this way, to the outside of the pipe. Then you slide
on your compression fitting or your ferrule. You slide your shutoff onto the pipe, then
you tighten it. Now mind you, this is either coming out of the floor or out of the wall.
So if the pipe was coming out of the wall, just for example, you would slide the nut
up to shutoff valve. You’ll be holding it in place with your fingers, and you just tighten
it like that. Now here’s the deal. You only want to turn this another one quarter turn
to one half turn. You don’t want to over-tighten the compression fitting. So again, if I were
holding this like so, all I would do is turn the shutoff valve another one quarter turn—maybe,
if that. And that should be enough to make this a water-tight seal. If you turn your
water back on, and water is leaking here, you want to turn this again one eighth to
one quarter turn. You don’t want to over-tighten it, or that ferrule isn’t going to work
the right way. So that’s it for a compression fitting shutoff valve.
The next kind of shutoff valve is a SharkBite push-on fitting. This just simply slides onto
the copper pipe. Now there’s one extra step that you need to take. And that is put the
SharkBite depth tool onto your copper pipe and make a mark with a Sharpie marker or any
kind of marker. This mark indicates how far you want to slide the SharkBite shutoff valve
onto the pipe. Now by the way, there is a plastic insert
in here. I called SharkBite. You do not need to remove this for copper pipes. This is just
meant to provide more rigidity for a CPVC or PEX pipes. But you don’t need to take
this out if you’re using a copper. So what you’ll do is you’ll slide it on until
it goes up to that mark. And that’s how you know it’s on the entire way. And again,
this is a quarter-turn ball valve. So it’s just going to turn one quarter turn—on and
off. One further note about these. They will spin 360° and that’s perfectly normal.
The nice thing about SharkBite fittings is if you wanted to get this off for whatever
reason, you would just use the SharkBite removal tool. Press in, and pull it off. Pretty simple.
These are super easy to use. I’ve been using them for over six years now, and not one leak.
Well there you go. Those are some quick tips on how to replace a shutoff valve, specifically
one for either your toilet, kitchen sink, or your bathroom faucet. I hope that these
tips helped you out. Let me know down in the comments if you have any other recommendations
that maybe I missed. Or let me know what your questions are down below. I’d be more than
happy to help you. And if you enjoyed today’s tips, you can always subscribe to the Home
Repair Tutor YouTube channel. We come out with weekly videos, and I’m really here
to help you out with all your home improvement needs.
So thanks so much for checking out the video. You can head back on over to Home Repair Tutor
as well and sign up for our newsletter. That comes out and lets you know about new videos,
new tutorials, new courses, and obviously giveaways that we do for tools and other great
stuff, all right? So thanks for watching today’s video. Take
care. I’ll talk to you soon.

100 Comments

  1. Great video. I just replaced my first one. Do you need to pull off the old compression fitting and nut? I just reused them…not knowing I could have replaced them too.

  2. Thanks for the info
    By knowing how the things work makes it easier to know what you are doing and repair them or change them
    Thanks for the great detail

  3. Thanks for this great video and information. For DIY'ers to complete a project like this I think it is important to understand the different tools and their purpose. Also, the plumbing setups at each location can present certain issues.

  4. Hello Sir. Nice video. Thank you for making and posting it. Question: ¿have you had good success replacing the bonnet packing seal in the older era (~1981) multi turn water stop shut off valve as you show in the very beginning of your video, please? I found a rebuild kit at Home Depot (Danco #88001, https://www.homedepot.com/p/DANCO-Repair-Kit-for-BrassCraft-Stops-88001/203206584). The question is prompted by the fact that my current bonnet nut's original nitrile packing is conical at its top/flat at bottom. Whereas the new (aforementioned) packing is flat (on both ends). So, I don't know if it will work. Wondering if you've run into this situation before. Any thoughts/insights appreciated. Thank you. tonyd.

  5. You do the most comprehensive, easy to follow tutorials ive seen…and i watch ALOT bc im a serial DIYr. Thank u so much!!!

  6. Thank you ! That was very concise and informative. The hardware store did not have the tool to remove the old ferrule, so I made one out of a automotive puller and a piece of angle iron. Just drill a 1/2" hole and cut open one side with a hacksaw to slip it over the copper pipe.

  7. Do I need to press that compression sleeve on with a tool in case of a water pressure spike. The b nut/ shutoff valve won't blow off and cause a massive leak.

  8. new subbie. what if there seems to be no space whatsoever between the nut and the wall. I can't see any length of pipe sticking out.

  9. Hi Jeff, the shark bite gate shut off valve video was helpful which is exactly what I'm installing in my basement for a utility sink. The water comes from the top so I want to install the valves vertically along the wall as the supply comes from the top. Is there any concerns about or tips for installing against the wall vertically? It's really the easiest place to put them. Thanks!

  10. Ferule pullers should be a must have for any property owner. I got one in amazon that looks a litle diff but havent used it yet. The one i have screws onto the nut behind the ferule and then you spin it and the nut pulls the ferrule off.

    Decided after fighting the ferrule on my last valve change

  11. If you replace a compression fitting shut-off valve, do you need to replace the compression nut and ring? Or can you just leave the existing nut and ferral on, and use them to secure to the new shut-off valve? Thanks.

  12. Can i use pex through the wall instead of copper and put a sharkbite shutoff valve on it and connect it to the toilet or faucets?

  13. I have a toilet that takes over four minutes to fill. I've replaced the fluid master and the supply line. So I disconnected it, put a brass 1/2" IPT to 3/4 GHT and connected a garden hose. Turned it on, not much coming out. Ran it a while. Maybe it's the shutoff valve, which is a compression fitting on a copper pipe. Alternatively the copper pipe could be clogged. Water everywhere else runs good. The toilet valve is tee'd off the cold water pipe which goes upstairs on the other side of the wall in the utility room. Everything past that tee has plenty of flow so I'm hoping it's just a bad valve not letting water get past.

  14. Great overview, never had heard of sharkbite, seems way too easy. I think I'll go with compression fittings, seems like a happy medium. Cheers

  15. Ever since we moved into this house the downstairs toilet has been slow fill then after we had the outside pipes replaced it got very slow fill (5 minutes). Today I finally got around to fixing it. Turned off the water, removed the toilet tank and hose (tight spot), removed the old compression valve from half inch copper pipe. I worked the compression sleeve off by hand with the nut behind it, it came off pretty easy. Then had a friend come over, I could see the dirt plug in the pipe. He went down in the basement and turned on the water while I held a bucket over the pipe. It trickled for a second then blasted out. Yelled to turn off the water, bucket almost filled. Installed the new compression quarter turn valve, reinstalled the toilet tank with new bolts and gasket, reconnected and turn on the valve…it filled in one minute, how sweet it is!

  16. Hey you're the guy I've been looking for! I've got a leak under my bathroom sink at the shut off valve so I put a pot under it to catch the water to flush my toilet because it is broken as well!!
    I'm watching videos until I feel confident enough to attempt repairs myself.

  17. Great video … thanks … my issue is I want to replace my bathroom faucet but the angle stop is so corroded that I can’t turn it to shut off the water … I don’t want to break it … any suggestions?

  18. Hi Jeff, could you tell me how much of the Cooper pipe should be out of the wall to use the compression shutoff valve? I have a shutoff valve that is bad and it was sweated on, so will need to cut the pipe to remove it, it will only leave me about 3/4" of pipe to work with. Is this enough?

  19. Quick question, does the Shark bite valve work just as well on PEX pipes? Im repairing the water supply lines on my mom's mobile home bathroom but noticed the water supply lines are not copper. Please ley me know!

  20. NEVER put pliers or pipe wrenches on a bright finish! Use adjustable wrenches. He would be fired from my jobs for that!

  21. Nice! The comment on the 360 degree spinning being OK on the Sharkbite valve is what I was wondering about.

  22. What about testing for leak testing after installing the compression valve? It's hard to fix the failed leak test after the sink is full assembled.

  23. Nice, descriptive video.  However, I wouldn't use two (or even one) pair of Channelocks.  They chew up the soft brass of the valve, which was chrome plated for appearance.  The same applies to the nuts on the stainless supply line.  You can instead use two combination wrenches or two adjustable wrenches (or use one of each).  They will do as good (if not a better) job of tightening the connections and cause no damage to the chrome.  Chewed-up valve parts are not pretty to look at, and make you look like an amateur who didn't know what he was doing.  Gee Dubb said it best:  Use the proper tool when(ever) possible.

  24. Great vid. As. DIYer I appreciate the explanation as you perform the task. How long do Shark bites last in comparison to a standard Brasscraft compression valve?

  25. Helps a lot, I changed in a copper plumb toilet and now needs to be change the shutoff valve on the sink. Now I understand better, cuz last time was a mess.

  26. I am preparing to change out my toilet tank parts. In shutting off my water below the commode tank, I discovered a plastic shut off valve. My question is, how do I know I am shutting off the water supply because the plastic valve simply spins around. Thanks.

  27. Great video for the valve itself! I think my leak is occurring where the actual line to the toilet attaches to the shut-off valve. Any advice on that?

  28. Jeff–Replace the 6 to 8-turn shut-off valve (which can spray a lot of water before you are able to turn it off) with a 1/4-turn shut-off valve.  The Pasco #4661 Compression Sleeve Puller is a good tool, but it may be too large to work in all situations, as is the case with other models.  The Pasco is around $30.00; none of these pullers is cheap, but they are your best bet if the sleeve (or "olive") has dug into the copper pipe or been flattened/compressed to the point it can't be removed.  I heard about the English Tool Company's "Dual Thread Compression Sleeve Puller" on a YouTube video; it's about 2-inches long, possibly the smallest one made.  Check out the video by Leah from "SeeJaneDrill".   It has a hex nut on the end instead of a sliding handle, so it can be turned with a combination wrench, or by using a stubby 3/8-drive ratchet and a 1/2-inch socket.  It's around $40.00.  If you're still having trouble removing the sleeve, you may have to resort to cutting the copper pipe directly behind the sleeve.  For that you can use a mini hacksaw or a copper pipe cutter, such as the a General Pipe Cleaners AutoCut ATC-12 Copper Tubing Cutter (for 1/2-inch pipe).  There is a tool that will cut through the brass sleeve by turning a nut with a wrench or pliers (it seems very effective in the video), but is also a little bulky and currently costs about $55.00.   I don't recommend using a hacksaw to cut through the brass sleeve, then split the sleeve apart with a flat-blade screw driver.   It's too easy to cut past the sleeve into the copper pipe, creating a leak, which may cause severe water damage in your house.

  29. Very helpful for people with copper pipes…but now a days builder (cheap) are using pex and different types of piping that is not copper. Some tips on those types would be great.

  30. I thought this might be easy to do but when I went to the hardware store I was overwhelmed with all of the choices and didn't know what I was getting myself into. Watching this video was very helpful and helped answer a few questions I had. Thanks for the easy to understand video!

  31. I couldn’t get the compression sleeve off. Instead of cutting the pipe though and having it get really short, I reused the old compression sleeve and nut. They seem to be holding up well a few hours later.

  32. I am having leaks from the shutoff valve in my kitchen. Your tips of replacing the shutoff valve very helpful. Thanks a lot

  33. I thought this was a video on how to repair shutoff valves, although after the repair tutorial on the multi turn valve, it turned into a how to install shutoff valves not how to repair them, it would be great if this video showed how to fix the other types of shutoff valves

  34. shit i think i over tightened my valve. i just finished replacing it, have turned the water main back on… the valve is off under my sink and there haven't been any drips so far over night. I'm replacing the sink now and will turn the water back on later today. i only wanted to tighten it 1/4 or 1/2 turn at most, but it was so loose when i did, like literally wobbling all over the end of the pipe. So i just kept turning until nice and snug

  35. Great info buddy…. I got to replace my toilet an ofcourse I have that 40 year old valve I'm just gonna replace but I'm stuck between the two compression valve or the push on do you recommend one over the other ? I can soider but I'm not a fan of its in a tough spot like it is so the half inch copper out of the wall doesn't have alot of room sticking out but I have a torch to heat it up to slide the old valve off…. Thanks…if you have the best valve to go of the 2 what you think of the 2 valves. Thanks…. [email protected]

  36. Thanks so much. Had a leaking shut off under the kitchen sink. I got the valve that looked like the existing valve thinking it was a simple threaded valve. Took the leaking one off to find it was a compression fitting.

    I try to avoid plumbing other than replacing a faucet so I’ve never worked on a compression fitting before but you guide helped immensely. Replaced it without much trouble.

    I have a couple more to replace that have bad knobs but no leaks. Not tonight though. It’s 11PM. lol.

    Thank You!

  37. I just bought thd the shark bite item as you mentioned for leaks. It also had a chrome plastic collar what is the purpose of it? Thank for great video.

  38. I have installed many SharkBite fittings and never use the marking tool or depth gauge. When you push on the fitting, you hear a click and it is seated onto the pipe, if you don't hear the click then it is not seated onto the pipe. When the click is heard it is at its proper depth onto the pipe. FYI.

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